Introduction of a maximum regulatory weight laden limit for 5 (or more) axle non-articulated (rigid) trucks.

 

  

IMPORTANT UPDATE

Regulations have now been signed by the Minister for Transport, Tourism and Sport, Deputy Shane Ross, giving effect to a maximum weight laden limit for 5 (or more) axle non-articulated (rigid) trucks (effective 1st February 2018).

 Information Note

Previously Road Traffic Regulations did not set out an overall maximum weight limit for non-articulated (rigid) vehicles with more than 4 axles. The Department of Transport, Tourism and Sport, in consultation with the Road Safety Authority and Transport Infrastructure Ireland, has examined the implications of applying a regulatory weight limit on rigid vehicles with 5 (or more) axles. The Department’s assessment was undertaken both from a road safety and a pavement wear perspective. 

 

On the basis of the Department’s assessment, the Minister for Transport, Tourism and Sport has approved a 36 tonne maximum regulatory weight laden limit that will apply to rigid mechanically propelled vehicles with 5 (or more) axles and which are first registered in the State on or after 1st February 2018. This limit will also apply to rigid mechanically propelled vehicles that will be modified (i.e. where an additional axle has been retrofitted) on or after 1st February 2018, and which following that modification have 5 (or more) axles. 

 

What does this mean for vehicle owners?

 

First registered in the State on or after 1st February 2018.

 

Rigid mechanically propelled vehicles with 5 (or more) axles and which are first registered in the State on or after 1st February 2018 will be subject to:

-        a 36 tonne maximum weight laden limit;  and

-        a maximum weight limit of 5.5 tonnes per metre on the wheelbase (distance between foremost and rearmost axles). 

  

In order to be plated, vehicles in this category must have one of the following: 

-        a manufacturer’s or an authorised distributor’s certificate of conformity stating that vehicle’s maximum permissible weight laden; or

-        a declaration of conformity, issued in the form available for download from the RSA website). The declaration of conformity must be signed and stamped by the manufacturer, or authorised distributor, or an appointed person (“‘appointed person’ means an appointed person for the purposes of the European Communities (Proof of Compliance) Regulations 2000 (S.I. No. 223 of 2000).

 

Vehicles modified on or after 1st February 2018 (where the total number of axles on such vehicles then becomes 5 (or more))

 

Rigid mechanically propelled vehicles that are modified on or after 1st February 2018 by the addition or removal of one or more axles so that, following that modification, the total number of axles on that vehicle is 5 (or more) will be subject to:

-        a 36 tonne maximum weight laden limit;  and 

-        a maximum weight limit of 5.5 tonnes per metre on the wheelbase (distance between foremost and rearmost axles). 

 

In order to be plated, vehicles in this category must be presented with: 

-        a declaration of conformity in the form available for download on the RSA website). The declaration of conformity must be signed and stamped by the manufacturer, or authorised distributor, or an appointed person.

 

Declarations of Conformity must state the maximum permissible weight laden following modification, and must confirm that vehicles have properly functioning anti-lock braking system (ABS) or electronic braking systems (EBS); along with air suspension systems or equivalent suspension systems.

 

Rigid mechanically propelled vehicles, which were in service with 5 (or more) axles and plated accordingly before 1st February 2018.

Vehicles in this category may continue to operate at their plated weight for ‘weights not to be exceeded in Ireland’, provided they comply with the individual axle and bogey limits stipulated in the Road Traffic (Construction and Use of Vehicles) Regulations 2003 as amended (S.I. No. 5/2003).

 

Further Information

A copy of the Statutory Instrument will be available shortly from electronic Irish Statute Book (eISB) website.